Part One. Part two will be up soon. I went to the B.C. Municipal Election Campaign Finance Reform – Implications for Democracy Panel Discussion + Q & A  tonight, Monday, April 14, 2014 at the Vancouver Public Library Downtown. Despite just coming from eye doc checkup with blurry eyes from eyedrops. Started meeting with shades, gradually returned to reg glasses.

The panel was organized by IntegrityBC and CityHallWatch.  Here is their notice about the meeting with links to relevant background material on civic election finance in “Rules, we don’t need no stinking rules” BC.

Here are my notes on the meeting. If you were there, let me know what you thought about it the comments section at the bottom. Picture of the panel by van greens

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#13. This post is a part of a series where people answer my anonymous survey question. If you have ADHD but haven’t gone public with it, what would it take to you go public with ADHD?

If you have ADHD but haven’t gone public with it, what would it take to you go public with ADHD?shareasimage

There are risks and rewards for going public with ADHD AND for staying hidden in the ADHD closet. See this post for context on the series.

“It would only take figuring out how and where and when.

ADHD is a devastating hidden disability that non ADDers don’t seem to want to hear about, don’t dare to try to understand. Maybe, even understandably, can’t.

The very concept of ADHD seems to shatter non ADDers fixed, unwavering, and unflappable core belief system that: behavior is completely volitional, and that any deviation is punishable. End of subject.

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To Do Lists VS Realistic To Do Lists For ADHD Adults

by Pete Quily on March 22, 2014 · 5 comments

Many ADHD adults have love/ hate / deep loathing relationships with their to do lists.

It’s very, very rare that I have a new adult ADHD coaching client who doesn’t have problems with their to do lists.

To do list tattoo. For forgetful adhd adults

Creative solution by Rob and Stephanie Levy

Many adults with ADHD have:

  • Very long to do lists
  • Multiple to do lists that are unmanageable
  • To do lists scattered in many places.
  • Often can’t find some of their to do lists
  • Have items they keep recopying from one list to another seemingly endlessly. Or from one day’s to do list to another day’s to do lists, sometimes for weeks
  • Often at the end of the day the ratio of completed tasks to uncompleted tasks are sadly in favour of the later

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I Believe That Not Going Public With ADHD Hinders The Possibilities Of Getting Help

by Pete Quily on February 5, 2014 · 0 comments

 

#12. This post is a part of a series where people answer my anonymous survey question. If you have ADHD but haven’t gone public with it, what would it take to you go public with ADHD?

There are risks and rewards for going public with ADHD AND for staying hidden in the ADHD closet. See this post for context on the series.

“I believe that not going public (with ADHD) hinders the possibilities of getting help.

In my case I spent my entire life with this problem, and no one could identify the problem.

Everyone tried to fix everything else other than what the real problem was.

At the age of 45 my sister and wife (both health care workers) were the ones that came up with this diagnosis, not the doctor. With the research that they did, they convinced me that this was my problem.

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One characteristic many of us ADDers have is persistence. IF we really want something, we can be phenomenally persistent and tenacious. This does NOT apply to all things, and rarely applies to paperwork:) The boring things we lose interest on very quickly.

But if we really want something, we can move heaven and earth to get it.

I’m not saying Diana has ADHD, but I think this she is an inspirational role model for adults with ADHD.

64 year old US endurance swimmer Diana Nyad first tried the 103 mile swim from Cuba 35 years ago in 1978 with a shark cage.  Couldn’t make it.

A second attempt – without a cage, in 2011 had to be called off because of shoulder pain and an asthma attack.

Later the same year, jellyfish stings stopped Ms Nyad’s third bid at the crossing.

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