I’m Profiled in The Georgia Straight Newspaper. ADHD Coach Improves Focus 13


I was profiled in this week’s Georgia Straight Newspaper, a very popular newspaper in my hometown of Vancouver on page 31.

The title of the article is ADHD Coach Improves Focus

Let me know what you think of it in the comments section on their website.
Thanks to Gail Johnson for a great article. I’m glad the Straight is helping to get the word out on Adult ADHD and Adult ADHD coaching. I’ve got some minor corrections below on the article but first here’s a few quotes.

After he learned he had the disorder, Quily researched approaches to managing it and found many that worked for him, including exercise, personal coaching, talk therapy, support groups, and spiritual exploration. He’s come a long way since the early ’90s, when he was diagnosed.

What helped Quily the most was personal coaching. He got so much out of the one-on-one sessions, in fact, that he became a coach himself. Now he specializes in helping adults with ADD who, like him, have a natural curiosity but who might be overwhelmed by paper clutter or unable to finish tasks, or find it hard to handle stress.

Quily helps others focus on the positive aspects of ADD. “People with ADD are creative; they think out of the box,” he says. “The thing that bothers me is that ADD is a mixed bag. It can really drag people down if you don’t know how to manage it, but it can propel you to great heights if you do manage it.…Coaching helps with the practical, day-to-day challenges: work, relationships, social things…time management, underemployment, job-hopping.…But there has to be an openness to change.”

Here are some minor clarifications.

  • I didn’t always do well in school, but overall did reasonably well, and made the dean’s honour’s list in University & got one of my essays published.
  • ADHD is not a neurobehavioural condition, it’s a neurobiological condition.

Gail said post in the comments she got it from another site.

  • Many ADDers do drop out of school, though not all, and some do very well in it, there are PHd’s with ADHD and billionaires with ADHD
  • You can have learning disabilities and high intelligence. They’re not mutually exclusive at all. LD has nothing to do with IQ. Some people with LD, like ADDers have very high IQ’s.

Gail just corrected the above on her post in the comments

If people with ADHD are interested in trying out Adult ADHD coaching to see how it can help improve their work and personal lives there are some benefits to it here and I do offer a free 15 minute consultation.

Again I’m glad the straight is shedding some light on this much ignored real condition. The Vancouver Sun recently had a great article on Adult ADHD, hope more of the BC media start covering the condition and if you live in BC remember during this provinical election to ask your campaigning politicians if they support the BC Medical Association’s 8 recomendations on ADHD in their February ADHD policy paper. One of those recommendations is to get the province to actually diagnose and treat Adult ADHD, and have a strategy on ADHD. Currently the govt has no strategy at all and NONE of the 3 parties mention ADHD in their campaign platforms.

The politicians will continue to ignore ADHD until ADDers and their families and friends start telling them why they should start taking it seriously and help us.


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13 thoughts on “I’m Profiled in The Georgia Straight Newspaper. ADHD Coach Improves Focus

  • Mark

    Coach Pete Quily
    I noticed ADHD 31 on the left bottom front page corner of the Georgia Straight newspaper. I read the article. I connected to many of the issues but disagreed with some of the points. I thought to myself } Coach Quily and i must have a different sub type of ADHD. { Still I really enjoyed Coach Quily’s point of view. Thinking about what to reply, to the Straight. I clicked to Coach Pete Quily’s blog. I agree, I would agree even more with the article in the Straight. With your corrections. Gail Johnson’s article is accurate and very informative. In fact, some of my disagreement, could be fact to a different person with ADD. I am a good driver, never had ticket or a accident, I would rather take the bus though. I am a great forklift driver. Hard on the back though!
    SKILLS vs ADHD,
    LIFESKILLS vs ADHD
    SKILLS vs ADHD LIFESKILLS
    TALENT vs LIFESKILLS
    TALENT vs ADHD LIFESKILLS
    Different SKILLS same ADHD.
    or
    Different SKILLS different ADHD

    Any thoughts? About Subtypes of ADHD?
    The CADDRA Website, you recomended, answers, many of my own questions ,that i have wondered about in a proper diagnose
    Makes a lot of sense and i would agree that the guide lines are much more advanced than i know, and am looking forward to studing CADDRA website closer. It’s taken me two hours to write this page. Pure torture, Ha! I’m going to polish some stone. Mark

  • Pete Quily

    Hi Mark, officially there’s the hyperactive impulsive, the inattentive and combined type (which combines the first two).

    Not everyone even within one type will all have the same problems, we’re unique and we may have ADHD that does not totally define us.

    Some ADDers are extroverted, some are introverts some are more visual, some more kinesthetic, some are very disorganized, some have learned to be very organized, we all have different talents etc.

    You might want to check out Dr. Ed Hallowell’s book Delivered from Distraction for a good overview on ADHD

  • DaveO

    Indeed with your coaching, ADD’ers can turn this condition into an advantage. I worked for Paul Orfalea for a few months and found him to be a genuine good guy who realized and accepted the way his brain worked and made the best of it.

  • Pete Quily

    Thanks Dave, wow didn’t know you worked with Paul Orfalea. Cool.

    Yes a big part of dealing with ADHD is acceptance, until you do that all the rest is pretty hard. Once you do that and get rid of or reduce resistance to reality, you’re in a better position to discover what works for you and adapt your life to it.